A blog about nothing.

Monday, December 3, 2012

HOG HEAVEN

Too often the focus of a discussion about whether to eat a certain way is limited to the realm of nutrition; i.e., this food offers more of these vitamins, or those minerals, or it burns fat, or builds muscle, etc.

It is important to remember that your food choices impact not only your own body but also the health of the environment, economy, not to mention the well-being of your fellow Earthlings. Which is why we say that the proper foods  require a relative minimum of resources and regenerate rather than ravage the environment, while being a source of pleasure and life rather than pain and death.

This holiday season, when you sit down to that turkey or that hog (and even for those who shun such foods, animal products often infiltrate family gatherings), and when you possibly pray over such food, as is customary for families to do, remember the words of the eminent Upton Sinclair, who wrote in "The Jungle" (1906) about these creatures whose pain we make our pleasure:

... “And each of them had an individuality of his own, a will of his own, a hope and a heart’s desire; each was full of self-confidence, of self-importance, and a sense of dignity. And trusting and strong in faith he (the hog) had gone about his business, the while a black shadow hung over him and a horrid Fate waited in his pathway. Now suddenly it had swooped upon him, and had seized him by the leg. Relentless, remorseless, it was; all his protests, his screams, were nothing to it - it did its cruel will with him, as if his wishes, his feelings, had simply no existence at all; it cut his throat and watched him gasp out his life. And now was one to believe that there was nowhere a god of hogs, to whom this hog personality was precious, to whom these hog squeals and agonies had a meaning? Who would take this hog into his arms and comfort him, reward him for his work well done, and show him the meaning of his sacrifice?” ...

If you believe in a God, or a higher intelligence, or a cosmic order, or in karma, fate, whatever, and especially if you now and then pray to such a being or power, you know the strength of hope, and the despair you may feel when your prayers seem to go unanswered. Now, take a moment to think of our animal friends lined up for slaughter, and imagine them beseeching a God who will never hear their lamentations. If, as we all do, you believe your prayers may be answered, give the turkeys and chickens and cows and pigs and fish of the world the possibility that theirs too may not fall on deaf ears, and that hog heaven may be on Earth, in a peaceful and natural life free of the pain and suffering animals raised for slaughter incur.
This Christmas, choose plants.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

10 LBS PER DAY KEEPS THE LAXATIVES AWAY

We have said it before and we'll say it again, humans require large quantities of food in order to feel satisfied and to encourage efficient digestion. We are talking in the range of 5 lbs or more a day. Concentrated foods provide lots of calories for small portion sizes due to the absence or lack of water and fiber, so it is wise to choose plant foods to meet your bulk needs.

If ever you find your digestion is a little sluggish (there is no excuse for not "going" at least once a day every day) try this diet on for size. We call it the 10 lb diet. Simple, the 10 LB diet calls for 10 lbs of food. Specifically, 8 lbs of fruit/vegetable fruits, 1 lb of leafy green vegetables, and 1 lb of lentils, beans, or non-gluten grain (quinoa, rice). Such an intake provides over 100 grams of fiber and well over the daily requirement of all major nutrients (except D, which you should get from the sun, and B12, which can be found in yeast) - and at under 2,500 calories.

Here it is:

1 lb bell pepper: 120 calories
1 lb cucumber: 55 calories
1 lb tomato: 80 calories
1 lb orange: 210 calories
1 lb apple: 200 calories
1 lb strawberries: 145 caloreis
1 lb banana (4): 400 calories
1/2 lb avocado (1 large): 325 calories
5 dates: 300 calories
.5 lb lentils: 265 calories
.5 lb brown rice: 250 calories
1 lb spinach: 100 calories

Total: 2,450 calories.

Feel free to substitute the above items with seasonal varieties, and to vary portion sizes according to hunger and body habitus. Chances are you will not be able to consume such a large quantity of food (unless you run like Forrest Gump): this goes to show you that you can eat as much as you wish as long as you choose the right foods.

Happy feasting.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

THE LOVELY PERSIMMON

Seasonal fruit is such a delight, and we encourage all our loved ones (that means you!) to visit your local farmer's market and see what's in stock. Autumn is a lovely time of year for orange foods. That means pumpkins and other ornately-colored squash, as well as oranges (which, like apples, are harvested starting in September/October).

While we're all familiar with these delicious foods (even though most use pumpkin as an ornament or dessert, you should try eating it as a squash!) fewer are intimately acquainted with the delicious persimmon.

Persimmon season is short (late October through December), so get them while they last. Japanese persimmons are teardrop shaped and should be eaten when soft, while Fuyu persimmons, native to California, look like heirloom tomatoes and are best enjoyed crunchy. Persimmons are low calorie foods (under 50 calories per fruit) and a good source of vitamin C. But nutrition aside, they are delish!

Eat them as you would apples, either for a snack, or atop a lunch salad, as pictured here:


The above lunch includes:

13 oz kale (two heads)
1/2 avocado
3 plum tomatoes
1 green chili pepper (nearly 200% of the RDA for vitamin C, at under 18 calories, and what a kick!)
1/4 red onion
seasoned with: herb blend, sea salt, juice of one lemon

Nutrition: 475 calories; 17 g fiber, nearly 3 cups water, and 20% or more of 16 major nutrients, including 700% RDA of vitamin C and 325% RDA of vitamin A.

We added 6 dates, to up the calorie total to 800 since we went on a morning run; another option is to add a can of your favorite beans, or perhaps a little quinoa, to increase the amount of protein in the meal. But there is nothing like an all-raw lunch for a quick boost of pure energy.

Enjoy!

Monday, November 12, 2012

MORE FOR YOUR MOUTHFUL

It has often been suggested that one should consume a tall glass of water whenever the urge to eat arises, and right before a meal. The body can mistake thirst for hunger, they say, and drinking water before you eat assures that you will consume less food.

Well, yes and no.

If you eat when you are thirsty, then you'll take in more calories than you would by simply quenching your thirst with, say, water, which is calorie free, so drinking water before eating is good advice. Besides, it helps to keep you hydrated.

But if you think that water fills your stomach and helps to make you feel fuller faster, guess again. Water is absorbed very rapidly by the stomach. We're talking a matter of minutes, likely before you've even had time to take you first mouthful of lunch or dinner.

Water AND fiber, however, will remain in your stomach for thirty minutes or more and a diet which includes ample amounts of foods containing both water and fiber - and these foods are without exception low-calorie foods - can certainly assist weight -loss efforts. It helps that these foods are highly nutritious, too.

Which foods are we talking about? Let's focus on the vegetable fruits.

Vegetable fruits are called fruits because they contain seeds, but they are also called vegetables because unlike traditional fruits like strawberries and mangos they are not sweet (and so do not contain sugar). The lack of sugar is the reason they are so low in calories.

Here are our three favorite vegetable fruits. They are low in calories, high in water and fiber, and high in vitamins and minerals, and are especially useful if you are pressed for time, as they can be enjoyed raw.

Bell Pepper

Per 100 calories, peppers offer you nearly 1000% of the daily requirement for vitamin C. That's not a typo. 1000% is 10 times the minimum amount recommended for this important antioxidant vitamin. Peppers also provide over 250% of the requirement for vitamin A, not to mention 10g of fiber. And each pepper you eat is like drinking a cup of water.

Tomato

Tomatoes are also high in vitamin A and vitamin C, and are very tasty sliced and enjoyed on their own.

Cucumber

Cucumbers are 95% water, and a pound of them provides a mere 50 calories, making them a very low calorie food. Cucumbers freshen the breath and cool you on a summer day. They are also a good source of phosphorous, copper, manganese, and magnesium. In winter, try a little cayenne pepper on them, to keep your blood warm.

Take This to Your Next Meal

Remember, the human body requires at least 5 pounds of food each day to satisfy its bulk needs. Dinner should be the largest meal of the day, at which you should consume roughly 3 pounds of food. Too often we skip meals; then, to satisfy our hunger, we reach for calorie-dense foods of inferior nutrition (high fat animal products and refined grains, especially). This is a recipe for poor health and excess weight.

So, at your next evening feast, start by eating a pound of one of the above foods. They will partially fill your stomach, assuring your do not overeat, while going far to meet your daily needs of water, fiber, vitamins and minerals.

One pound is roughly 2 large bell peppers, 3 large tomatoes, OR two 6-inch cucumbers. Simply slice, season with your favorite spices or sea salt, add a spritz of lemon, and enjoy.

Monday, August 6, 2012

REASONS FOR SEASON-INGS


The human tongue comes equipped with taste buds for various taste sensations. These include sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. Textbooks differ on the existence of a fifth taste bud. Perhaps, and this is only speculation, only a portion of the population has the spicy taste bud, which might explain why some enjoy spicy food, and others are averse to it. We are kidding, of course. Spicy foods are actually picked up by pain receptors in the brain, which, if you eat enough of them, can make you feel somewhat like this poor fella:


Be that as it may, the average person uses spices, seasonings, and sauces to some degree. And why not? If you have the taste buds (and the receptors), it can't hurt to stimulate them now and again (or it can, but that's why we reach for those jalapenos, don't we? hurts so good?). But spicy food is not just for the masochistic; hot food can increase the metabolism as well as act as an appetite suppressent; moreover, the capsaicin present in peppers such as serrano, jalapeno, and habanero, acts as a natural pain reliever. And your body's response to pain is to release opoid-like hormones called endorphins, which make you feel oh, so good. In all, not bad reasons to go ahead and spice it up.

The problem comes not from spicy foods, but from the sauces and salsas that are used in their creation. Next time you reach for that bottle of salsa, sauce, seasoning, or marinade, take a close look at the ingredients it contains. Note that many sauces contain ingredients lists that run a paragraph long, maybe more, and contain unpronounceable and in many cases exotic names designed to disguise what's really inside.

To avoid the stomach upset, gas, and bloat associated with these sauces, stay away from products with more than 3 to 5 ingredients, especially when those ingredients include canola oil (which is often genetically modified), or its synonym, rapeseed oil. Also, wheat, gluten, and xanthan gum are all best avoided, as are MSG (monosodium glutamate, a neurotoxin), and corn and its byproducts (often genetically modified). Even dehydrated onion and garlic can cause heartburn, as can salsas that include diced tomatoes (which ferment in the jar after it has been opened) and diced onions (one word: flatulence).

Using spices with a hodgepodge of less than healthful ingredients can cancel out some of the beneficial effects of eating nutritious foods. While these precautions seem to preclude every sauce, there are some that will delight your palate without upsetting your tummy or causing heartburn.

Go for these:

1. Mustard (especially dijon)
2. Tabasco sauce (only three ingredients, and what a kick!)



3. Soy sauce (but make sure there is no wheat, and the soybeans are non-GMO)

4. Lemon juice


5. Coconut milk (but make sure to purchase the light variety)


6. Diced olives and/or jalapeno peppers are also good, in moderation.


The above ingredients can enhance the flavor of virtually any dish (except perhaps, fresh fruit) and leave you feeling satisfied and energized. Happy eating!

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

DRINK IT!


We've all been told to drink enough water, but how many of us are adequately hydrated? The daily requirement for water for inactive males is 3.5 liters (about 14 cups); for inactive females the requirement is 2.5 liters (about 10 cups). This is to replace losses in breath, sweat, urine, feces, and metabolic processes that use water (these reactions are referred to by the blanket term hydrolisis). The water can come in the form of food or beverages.

http://www.iom.edu/Global/News%20Announcements/~/media/442A08B899F44DF9AAD083D86164C75B.ashx

Fruits and vegetables are mainly water, and a diet exclusively of plant foods can go far towards hydrating you. In fact, if you were to eat 2,000 calories solely from fruits, vegetables, and other plant foods, like beans, you could get as much as 3.5 liters of water, meeting the requirement for either sex. This is because fruits and vegetables are as much as 90 percent water. In contrast, grains, nuts, and animal foods are drier in that they contain less water.

But even on such a plant food diet, the active person (which we hope means YOU) should not neglect to supplement intake with good ole plain water. A good rule of thumb is for every thirty minutes you exercise, drink one pint (16 oz.) of water. It also helps to drink water first thing in the morning (1 pint), and before lunch and dinner. Also, before and after exercising.

We urge you to guard against dehydration, especially in the summer months. The effects of dehydration can be devastating, and in many cases mimic the effects of very serious health conditions. It is not uncommon for someone who has not been getting enough fluids to feel one or more of the following symptoms: fatigue, dizziness, depression, dry skin, irritability, headache, constipation, and poor workout recovery. Who doesn't feel these, and how easy they are to address!

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=symptoms

Signs of dehydration include rapid heart rate and decreased urine output. If you are not urinating every 2 to 3 hours, or if your urine is darker than the color of lemonade, or if you feel dizzy when you stand up quickly, you need to drink more water.

Take home message: If you're sedentary, drink at least 4 cups of water during the summer months. If you are active, drink at least 8 cups. This is assuming you are a vegan and derive 2.5 to 3.5 liters of water from your food. If you eat meat, nuts, or grains, you may need to drink more.

Also, drink cold water, it is absorbed more quickly by the stomach. Plus, it has the added benefit of cooling you off more quickly than even a cold dip in the pool. Drinking cold water also increases your metabolism, an added benefit.

Finally, if you sweat a lot, be sure to replace sodium losses by salting your food, or by adding 1 tsp of salt per liter of water, as about 1 g of sodium is lost in every liter of sweat.

Also, aim for distilled or spring water. Tap water has chemical residues and chlorine; however, tap water is better than no water.

Drink more water and watch your energy levels soar!

Friday, June 8, 2012

SIX SIMPLE STEPS TO SERENITY


Here is a simple progression to improve your diet, whether you need a complete overhaul or merely some fine-tuning. Print this and paste on your fridge for easy reference.

1. Eat fruit till noon. As much or as little as you wish, but only fruit.
Example: Morning Smoothie

Blend one orange, add two fresh bananas and blend till smooth. Then, add one frozen banana and one cup of your choice of frozen berries (strawberry, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry).

2. Eat a salad for lunch.
Chop one head of kale, add to this one medium diced tomato, 1/2 avocado, the juice of one lemon, and 1 tbsp Bragg's amino acids. Mix thoroughly. Top with fresh fruit. For example, one cup strawberries, 4 medjool dates, and 1 apple.

Note: Kale may be substituted with Romaine lettuce or baby spinach. Also, 1 cup of canned beans of your choice (kidney, white, garbanzo, black) may be substituted for the fruit. Be sure to rinse and strain before consuming.

3. Start dinner with 3 of your favorite crunchy vegetables.
Favorites are cucumbers, bell peppers, carrots, and mushrooms. Dice one cup of mushrooms and plate with 1 diced red bell pepper. Season with ground herbs. Nutritional yeast provides additional flavor. Mustard may also be used. Diced olives add savor, but be sparing (5 olives per day, with 1/2 avocado, meets your fat requirements).

4. Have 100 calories of your favorite green for dinner.
 Choose kale, collards, chard, or spinach. If you ate kale or spinach for lunch, boil 3 cups of Swiss chard for dinner; alternatively steam collards for 5-7 minutes. Other tasty greens include asparagus, green beans, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts for the adventuresome. Season your greens with soy sauce, nutritional yeast, a few diced olives, sund-dried tomatoes, lemon, mustard, and/or tabasco sauce.

5. Replace what you normall eat for dinner with beans and a healthy starch, notably potatoes or squash.
Steam a sweet potato for 5-7 minutes, blend it in a vitamix or equivalent until smooth. It hardly needs to be seasoned. Alternatively, use quinoa, but limit yourself to 1 cup cooked.

6. Watch the weight melt away.

* Stay on each step for one week to one month before going to the next step, depending on how in need you are of a dietary upgrade.

* A piece of fresh fruit may be enjoyed for dessert.

* If you enjoy coffee, limit yourself to 2 cups daily (10 ounces), enjoy black with a dash of stevia, and drink before 10 a.m.

* Wine/beer may be enjoyed in moderation (1 glass per day for women, 2 for men).

Here is the nutritional breakdown for the above meals:

Breakfast: banana/berry smoothie

Lunch: Avocado salad with fruit or beans

Dinner: Raw veggies followed by lightly cooked greens, with 1 cup beans and 1 sweet potato

Dessert: fresh or frozen fruit (optional)

Take note that this meal provides 2 liters of water and nearly 80 grams of fiber, in addition to all major nutrients (except vitamin D, which you should be getting from the sun). At under 1,800 calories. Enjoy!





Banana, raw
315
1.2
80.9
3.9




Raspberries, raw
64
0.8
14.7
1.5




Orange, raw
62
0.2
15.4
1.2




Kale, raw
100
1.4
20.1
6.6




Avocado, raw
138
12.7
7.4
1.7




Chard, swiss, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
105
0.4
21.7
9.9




Sweet potato, raw, unprepared
112
0.1
26.2
2.0




Chickpeas
286
2.7
54.3
11.9




Olives, ripe, canned
34
2.9
2.3
0.4




Yeast
106
1.7
13.8
13.8




Tomatoes, raw
22
0.2
4.8
1.1




Lemon juice
6
0.1
2.0
0.1




Strawberries, raw
49
0.5
11.7
1.0




Dates, medjool
266
0.1
72.0
1.7




Mushrooms, brown, Italian, or Crimini, raw
19
0.1
3.0
1.8




Pepper, sweet, red, raw
39
0.4
9.0
1.5

RDA% RDA
Vitamin A
4,411.0
mcg
900.0
490
Vitamin A
88,244.9
IU
----
Vitamin B6
5.6
mg
1.3
428
Vitamin B12
4
mcg
120
150
Vitamin C
792.9
mg
90.0
881
Vitamin D
0.0
5.0
0
Vitamin D
0.0
----
Vitamin E
17.9
mg
15.0
119
Vitamin E
26.7
IU
----
RDA% RDA
Calcium
989.7
mg
1,000.0
99
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
----
Copper
3.8
mg
0.9
425
Iron
31.8
mg
8.0
398
Magnesium
931.6
mg
420.0
222
Manganese
8.5
mg
2.3
371
Niacin
31.4
mg
16.0
196
RDA% RDA
Pant. Acid
12.6
mg
5.0
253
Phosphorus
1,458.8
mg
700.0
208
Potassium
9,325.3
mg
4,700.0
198
Riboflav
3.9
mg
1.3
301
Selenium
47.4
mcg
55.0
86
Sodium
2,242.1
mg
1,500.0
149
Thiamin
2.0
mg
1.2
169
Water
2,016.3
g
----
Zinc
11.7
mg
11.0
106
Calories
1,723
Fat
25.4
213
12
%
Saturated
3.6
30
2
%
Polyunsaturated
5.3
44
3
%
Monounsaturated
12.7
106
6
%
Carbohydrate
359.0
1,324
77
%
Dietary Fiber
78.9
Protein
60.1
181
11
%
Alcohol
0.0
0
0
%
Fat
(12%)
Carbs
(77%)
Protein
(11%)
Alcohol
(0%)


Thursday, May 31, 2012

NOT ALL LEAFIES CREATED EQUAL-IE


People often make the mistake of lumping leafy greens into the same category. While it's true that these maximally nutritious vegetables should be eaten every day without fail, there are some differences in the nutritional profiles of, for example, spinach and Swiss chard on the one hand, and cruciferous veggies such as collards, kale, and broccoli on the other, and these differences are worthy of note.

Crucifers
Cruciferous vegetables include kale, cabbage, collard greens, bok choy, broccoli, and cauliflower. While known for their anticancer properties, these delicious vegetables are also high in vitamins A, C, and K, as well as fiber and omega 3 fatty acids.

Chenopods
Chenopods include spinach, Swiss chard, and beet greens. Unlike the crucifers, which are with few exceptions best prepared steamed, the chenopods lend themselves to quick boiling of up to 3 minutes in the case of chard, or 1 minute for spinach.

The chenopods tend to be higher in iron, calcium, folate, and perhaps most importantly, vitamin E, than the crucifers. As vitamin E is not widely available in foods, make an effort to include either chard or spinach in your diet daily. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that also helps promote healthy, wrinkle-free skin.

How to go about it
Of the greens, kale and baby spinach can be served either raw or cooked. Try mixing a head of kale (finely chopped) plus 4 cups of  baby spinach with avocado, lemon and salt for a nutritious and delicious salad, as pictured above.

For dinner, 2 cups of boiled Swiss chard serves as a delicious base to your favorite main course. In fact, it is so delicious, you may wish to double the serving, add tomatoes and a cup of chickpeas, and make it your main course. Add some nutritional yeast and Greek olives for a savory flavor. Another option is to combine broccoli and kale and steam for 5 minutes. Let greens form the base of at least one meal per day, preferably two.

Whatever you do, aim to include both chenopods and crucifers in your daily dietary intake. These foods are the most important dietary health investment that you can make. Enjoy!

Thursday, April 26, 2012

GO GREEN

I often mention eating fruit and only fruit for breakfast and until noon as the single-most important dietary change you can make. Fruit is a source of easily digestible sugar, high in water and fiber, and a good source of many major vitamins and some minerals. The next most important dietary change?

EAT GREENS

If an apple a day keeps the doctor away, 100 calories worth of leafy green vegetables elevates you to super hero status.

Which vegetables are we referring to? Especially:

Spinach

Kale

Swiss chard

Collards







SPINACH
Baby spinach can be eaten raw. Spinach is also great boiled for 2 minutes. 100 calories is roughly 3 cups of boiled spinach, or 1 bunch of raw spinach. Raw spinach is a great base to a salad. Boiled spinach is wonderful mixed with your favorite bean.

Amount Per Serving (1 bunch)
Calories
103.5
Calories from Fat
14.7
Fat
1.8
g
3
%
Saturated Fat
0.28
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.74
g
Monounsaturated Fat
0.045
g
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
0
%
Sodium
355.5
mg
15
%
Potassium
2,511.0
mg
72
%
Carbohydrate
16.3
g
5
%
Dietary Fiber
9.9
g
40
%
Protein
12.9
g
26
%
Alcohol
0.0
g
Vitamin A
844
%
Calcium
45
%
Vitamin D
0
%
Thiamin
23
%
Niacin
16
%
Vitamin B6
44
%
Phosphorus
22
%
Selenium
6
%
Vitamin C
211
%
Iron
68
%
Vitamin E
45
%
Riboflavin
50
%
Vitamin B12
0
%
Manganese
202
%
Copper
29
%
Magnesium
89
%
Zinc
16
%
KALE
Like spinach, kale can also be eaten raw. Another option is to steam kale for 5 minutes. Finely chop kale and remove the fibrous stems. Trader Joe's sells precut kale, which is very convenient. 100 calories is about 8 oz of raw kale, equivalent to 3 cups. If you are counting by the stalk, each stalk is about 10 calories, and there are 10 stalks in a bunch, so if you're making a salad for lunch, 1 bunch of raw kale is what you'll need. Kale is heavily-sprayed, so go organic.


Nutrition Facts
Amount Per Serving (1 bunch)
Calories
100.5
Calories from Fat
11.8
Fat
1.4
g
2
%
Saturated Fat
0.18
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.68
g
Monounsaturated Fat
0.1
g
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
0
%
Sodium
86.4
mg
4
%
Potassium
898.5
mg
26
%
Carbohydrate
20.1
g
7
%
Dietary Fiber
4.0
g
16
%
Protein
6.6
g
13
%
Alcohol
0.0
g
Vitamin A
618
%
Calcium
27
%
Vitamin D
0
%
Thiamin
15
%
Niacin
10
%
Vitamin B6
27
%
Phosphorus
11
%
Selenium
3
%
Vitamin C
402
%
Iron
19
%
Vitamin E
0
%
Riboflavin
15
%
Vitamin B12
0
%
Manganese
78
%
Copper
29
%
Magnesium
17
%
Zinc
6
%
CHARD
Swiss chard is best boiled for a couple minutes. Dice it and remove the fibrous stems. 100 calories is 3 cups cooked. Each leaf of chard has 10 calories, so grab a bunch of chard and you can be sure you achieve your 100 daily calorie quota.

Amount Per Serving (1 bunch)
Calories
102.6
Calories from Fat
9.0
Fat
1.1
g
2
%
Saturated Fat
0.16
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.38
g
Monounsaturated Fat
0.22
g
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
0
%
Sodium
1,150.2
mg
48
%
Potassium
2,046.6
mg
58
%
Carbohydrate
20.2
g
7
%
Dietary Fiber
8.6
g
35
%
Protein
9.7
g
19
%
Alcohol
0.0
g
Vitamin A
661
%
Calcium
28
%
Vitamin D
0
%
Thiamin
14
%
Niacin
11
%
Vitamin B6
27
%
Phosphorus
25
%
Selenium
7
%
Vitamin C
270
%
Iron
54
%
Vitamin E
51
%
Riboflavin
29
%
Vitamin B12
0
%
Manganese
99
%
Copper
48
%
Magnesium
109
%
Zinc
13
%

COLLARDS

Collard greens are a hearty vegetable and southern specialty. Steam them for 5 minutes, or a little longer if you wish for a more tender consistency. But be reminded that the longer you cook these greens, the greater the nutritional loss of major nutrients.

Amount Per Serving (1 bunch)
Calories
108.0
Calories from Fat
12.7
Fat
1.5
g
2
%
Saturated Fat
0.2
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.72
g
Monounsaturated Fat
0.11
g
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
0
%
Sodium
72.0
mg
3
%
Potassium
608.4
mg
17
%
Carbohydrate
20.5
g
7
%
Dietary Fiber
13.0
g
52
%
Protein
8.8
g
18
%
Alcohol
0.0
g
Vitamin A
480
%
Calcium
52
%
Vitamin D
0
%
Thiamin
13
%
Niacin
13
%
Vitamin B6
30
%
Phosphorus
4
%
Selenium
7
%
Vitamin C
212
%
Iron
4
%
Vitamin E
40
%
Riboflavin
28
%
Vitamin B12
0
%
Manganese
50
%
Copper
7
%
Magnesium
8
%
Zinc
3
%

These foods are powerhouses, and in them resides the power to prevent and reverse disease including aging, and keep you flying high for life.

And here is a great site to explore the nutritional content of these and other of your favorite foods:
slimkicker.com

So, if you consume fruit and only fruit until noon, AND eat 100 calories of one leafy green per day, you can be assured that your diet is in the 99th percentile in the world. Check out future blogs for other modifications you can make, including RULE NUMBER THREE.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

THE MONOMEAL


The raw community stands staunchly behind the benefits of what is known as the monomeal. As the name suggests, you choose one type of food, and make an entire meal out of it. What could be easier?

Monomeals have the benefit of convenience, nutrition, and deliciousness. What's more, they are very easy to digest.

Want to give the monomeal a shot? The best candidates are fruits, which can be eaten whole and unseasoned. They provide instant energy to propel you through the day ahead. And because fruit is so high in water, you won't need to drink any liquids with your lunch (or breakfast, or dinner). Not only that, you can exercise a short while after completing the feast. Some of our favorite foods to eat exclusively (usually for lunch) include apples, bananas, and oranges. If you crave salt, you may wish to choose vegetable fruits - for example bell peppers or tomatoes, which are highly nutritious and pair well with a dash of sea salt, and maybe a little lemon and basil.

You can also make a monomeal of tropical fruits such as papaya, mango and melon, but some preparation is involved here, as these fruits need to be diced and packaged. Start simple: grab a bag of oranges, and dig in.

One word of warning. Be prepared to eat a lot of food. In order to take in sufficient calories (500 to 600) you'll fill you stomach to capacity, but you won't feel stuffed, and 15 minutes later, the fullness will abate, and the energy will last for hours. This is because the water from these high water content foods gets absorbed immediately into your bloodstream. And most of the below meals meet your fiber intake, as well as many major vitamins and minerals. Take a look.



10 oranges provide 620 calories, 12 g of protein and 30+ g of fiber, 4 cups of water, in addition to 25% or more of the daily value for 9 major nutrients, including 775% of the RDA for vitamin C. Slice 'em in advance, fill a bowl, and enjoy!



9 apples supplies 650 calories, 30 g of fiber, 4 cups of water, and 25% or more of the RDA for 5 major nutrients. Choose your favorite apple type and take a bite, or mix up a couple winners, like Red Delicious and Honey Crisp. Prepare to give your jaw a workout. Lots of chewing here.



6 bananas gives you 630 calories, 18 g of fiber and 25% or more of 11 nutrients. This is a favorite meal among many, since 6 bananas can be consumed pretty quickly. Great if you only have a few minutes to wolf down lunch.



You'll have to consume a lot of strawberries to get 500 calories, but we have done it and so can you. 10 cups provide 460 calories, 30 g of fiber, 1.3 L of water, and 25% of more of 14 major nutrients. Find a strawberry patch near you, or visit a farmer's market. 3 baskets of strawberries is pretty close to your quota.



Tomatoes are a pretty perfect food. Eat these when you are thirsty. Slice them up nice and add a bit of salt and seasonings. Because they are so high in water, you'll need to eat quite a few (18 large whole), but it's worth it. They are extremely savory and satisfying. Plum tomatoes are inexpensive, and buying 4 boxes is a meal in itself. 590 calories, 3L of water, 40 g of fiber, and 100% or more of 11 nutrients! wow!



We love the tricolor ones from Trader Joe's (yellow, orange, red). Add a few green ones to the mix. 13 large peppers provide 550 calories, 45 g of fiber, 100% or more of 9 nutrients, and 8 cups of water. What better way to hydrate than with whole foods!!!

So give the monomeal a try, and don't be intimidated by portion size. When eating and drinking is achieved with every delicious mouthful, you need to think big.